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Junkbusters helps people get rid of spam, telemarketing calls, unwanted junk mail, junk faxes, and more. Junkbusters.com is a leading consumer resource on the control of junk communications and the protection of privacy.

Cyber Threat/Network Incident Report

Anti-spam legislation was introduced in at least 30 states in 2002, with laws passed by Kansas, Maryland, Minnesota, South Dakota and Utah, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Cyberangels - Formed to help people who need help online. Whether you're being cyberstalked, harassed or defrauded, find child pornography or cyberpredators; even if you just want to learn how to use the Internet better or have simple questions about how things work, we can help.

WHOA - A volunteer organization to fight online harassment through education of the public, law enforcement personnel, and empowerment of victims. Volunteers work with people experiencing online harassment, and help others learn how to avoid such harassment or minimize its impact. Cyberstalking Statistics Report. See also sexual harassment and violence.

National Security Agency - The Nation's cryptologic organization coordinates, directs, and performs highly specialized activities to protect US Information systems and produce foreign intelligence Information A high technology organization, NSA is also one of the most important centers of foreign language analysis and research within the Government.

2003 Guide to Computer and Internet Crimes and Cybercrime: Hacking, Intellectual Property Crimes, Policy, Cases, Guidance, Laws, Documents, Web Crimes, Targets (Core Federal Information Series CD-ROM) by U.S. Government -- This comprehensive CD-ROM provides the work of the Justice Department on computer crime and intellectual property crimes and the National Infrastructure Protection Center (NIPC), national critical infrastructure threat assessment, warning, vulnerability, law enforcement investigation and response entity, providing timely warnings of international threats, comprehensive analysis and law enforcement investigation and response. Topics include: The new and revised Electronic Search and Seizure Manual (Searching and Seizing Computers and Obtaining Electronic Evidence in Criminal Investigations, July 2002) NIPC - Information Sharing, Legal Issues, Warnings, Publications, Major Investigations, Incident Reports. Legal Issues of Electronic Commerce Encryption and Computer Crime Federal Code Related to Cybercrime Intellectual Property Crime International Aspects of Computer Crime Privacy issues in the High-Tech Context Prosecuting Crimes Facilitated by Computers and the Internet Protecting Critical Infrastructures Cyberethics and Cyberethics for Kids. Nearly 9,000 pages allowing direct viewing on Windows and Apple Macintosh systems. Reader software is included. Our CD-ROMs are privately compiled collections of official public domain US government files and documents. They present thousands of pages that can be rapidly reviewed, searched, or printed. Vast archives of important public domain government information that might otherwise remain inaccessible. A great reference work and educational tool. There is no other reference as fast, convenient, comprehensive, thoroughly researched, and portable.

Crime and Law in Media Culture
by Sheila Brown
How are crime and the law defined by media culture? Why do we need media crime? What is the impact of cyberculture on crime and the law? The range and scope of contemporary media forms are vast, but what is the place of law and criminology in relation to them? The whole of society, including crime and criminal justice, is embraced by media culture. 'The media' are not just a set of institutions, but constitute a way of existence that defines crime and legal forms. In short, the book sets out to assess how crime and the law, and our understanding of them, are produced and reproduced, disturbed, challenged and changed through media culture. The author organizes her inquiry around substantive topic areas set within a theoretical framework. From soaps to President Clinton, globalism to cyberworlds, she provides an accessible critique of 'cultural theory' and a theoretically coherent examination of the relationship between crime, law, media and culture. In all, this innovative and engaging text, containing a wide range of lively examples, aims to open up the boundaries between the more traditional aspects of law and criminology, and the broader concerns of sociological and cultural studies.

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